Tag Archive: book


So, it’s been a long journey, and I’m still not done with the series yet. But I’m very excited for the release of A Memory of Light, the last book in a series that has taken about the entire length of my life to write. The books are amazing, addicting, and the plot is intricately written, the characters are brilliantly done. However, this isn’t a review. Dwayne and I both squealed when we heard the release date for this book – next January. They are releasing the book  in the last month of the year of the dragon – nothing more fitting, in my opinion. I have a blog written by Brandon Sanderson, the author to share with you. Here’s the post, from his author’s page on goodreads:

 

I finished the final revision on A Memory of Light early in the morning Saturday, then sent it off to Team Jordan. And I was done. Team Jordan will handle the copyedits and proofreads; I might have a chime-in now and then on how a passage should be tweaked or how a continuity issue should be addressed, but essentially, my involvement as a writer in the Wheel of Time has come to an end.

 

 

Now, that doesn’t mean my involvement with Wheel of Time fandom is over. I’ll have my appearance at Dragon*Con this year, as well as the tour in January for A Memory of Light. Beyond that, I intend to frequently attend JordanCon and be available to WoT fans for years, even decades, to come. I intend to talk a great deal about the experience of writing these books, perhaps even post some blog entries about the subject.

 

 

But the writing is done. I’m still a little in shock about that.

 

 

Just about five years ago, I got that fateful call from Harriet. Since that time, I have always had a Wheel of Time book that I needed to be working on. Occasionally I would take breaks, as I did to write The Alloy of Law a couple years ago. However, the knowledge that I soon needed to be back to work on the Wheel of Time was always there.

 

 

That work has been my constant companion. For reference, when I got that call, I had only released a couple of books: the second Mistborn novel had come out the month before. I had written others that were awaiting publication—including several Alcatraz books, the last Mistborn book, and Warbreaker. I also had a draft done of The Way of Kings, another done of The Rithmatist, and some preliminary work done on a book called Steelheart.

 

 

Yes, I’d written a lot. I still had only a handful of books out in stores. It had been two years since Elantris was released. I was brand new at this.

 

 

I still feel brand new. Yet, oddly, I also feel weathered. Finishing the Wheel of Time has been a wonderful experience, but it has also been grueling. I have always respected Robert Jordan, but now I respect him even more—and for a multitude of reasons. One of those is the fact that during most of his career, he was able to release a Wheel of Time book every year or two. That’s an awesome amount of work. Doing three books has worn me out.

 

 

For five years, whatever I’ve been doing—whether it be going out to dinner, sitting down to write, or checking my email—I’ve known that there was more to do on the Wheel of Time. I’ve known that I gave my word to Harriet and to the fans that I would work hard to get those books out quickly, and I carried a weight of responsibility for the book being split and people being forced to wait years beyond when they expected to get the ending. For five years, I have worked long hours because of those reasons. All the time I could find, I dedicated to the Wheel of Time in one way or another.

 

 

And then, today, I did not have a Wheel of Time book to work on.

 

 

I’ve reached the end of the journey and set down my burdens. It’s wonderful, relaxing, and solemn all at once. I love the Wheel of Time. It’s also great to be done.

 

 

And so, today, I officially take a step toward a line. I step away from being pilot of this series, and toward once again being just a fan. I will never cross back over that line—whatever else happens, I will have written three books in this series. I will continue to support and engage with Wheel of Time fandom. However, an ending has arrived for me, and it is time for my attention to be turned elsewhere.

 

 

Now I stroll back into my workshop and find that a little bit of dust has gathered. Out of necessity, the Stormlight Archive has been neglected. I am pleased I made the choice to work on A Memory of Light instead of Stormlight 2. However, it is time to pick up that story again and make this series all of the awesome things I’ve dreamed of it being for some twenty years.

 

 

The stories of Mat, Rand, Egwene, and Perrin are now done. Returning to the stories of Kaladin, Shallan, Jasnah, and Dalinar will be my next major project. You’ll also see me doing revisions on both The Rithmatist and Steelheart this fall—as I’ve made arrangements for both to be published next year or the year after. You’ll probably hear more about them in the days to come. And yes, I WILL be doing a sequel to The Alloy of Law.

 

 

It has been an incredible experience finishing the Wheel of Time. I hope that some of you who were with me on that journey will join me for the Stormlight books, but I want to note that I don’t automatically assume that if someone reads the Wheel of Time they will read my other work. I occasionally have someone come through one of my signing lines who feels guilty for “only” having a Wheel of Time book. There is no need to feel guilty for this; I love the Wheel of Time as you do, and we share that. I’m glad you’ve enjoyed some of my writing, and I feel as close to those books as I do to any I’ve written. Yes, the Wheel of Time is not mine. But those three books are mine. I love them just as much as any I’ve worked on.

 

 

I look forward to continuing to meet many of you at conventions and signings as the years move forward. Thank you, Wheel of Time fandom, for accepting me in and putting up with my mistakes. (There have been many.) Thank you, Brandon Sanderson fandom, for putting up with my deviations in the Wheel of Time universe. I know it has slowed down you getting your books, but this was something very important for me to do.

 

 

Robert Jordan was a great man, and was the single greatest influence on my development as a writer. What I have done these last five years has been an attempt—a sometimes flawed but always earnest attempt—to show my appreciation. This entire genre owes him an enormous debt. My debt to him, and to Harriet, is greatest of all.

 

 

Mr. Jordan, may you rest in the Light. Everyone else, take a breath and get ready for the end. May you find his final words as satisfying to read as I did when I first picked them up five years ago. The very last scene is his, touched very little by me, as are significant chunks of the ending at large. I have achieved my goal in writing the books so that they pointed toward this ending he wrote, allowing us to include his words with as little alteration as possible.

 

 

Once again, thank you. May you always find water and shade.

 

Brandon Sanderson

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I finally figured out how to make the booklist in the format I wanted it in! Unfortunately, this means I found out how to do so at the expense of my booklist. 😦 I opened my booklist while viewing the booklist Freak0Nature sent me… And Microsoft automatically put it in a compatability mode to make sure the two documents had the same features available in Word. This meant that my list was reconfigured, and the information was scrambled. I literally had hundreds of books, so I can’t just rewrite it from memory. I’ve got some series that have 1 book instead of 6, or that have 20+ books instead of 4. I’m going to have to start from scratch, because unfortunately, I can’t simply turn off compatibility mode; it’s a conversion to the document that I don’t know how to undo. I’ve also been playing with the idea of including what I have on my bookshelves and color-marking them as read or unread, then as I write reviews for them, make them links. Sounds like a lot of work, but it would be absolutely great in my opinion… If only there was a site to do this for me!

Well, there kind of is. For those of you who haven’t discovered it yet, Goodreads.com has thousands of books on file, and you can put them on ‘shelves’ to keep track of them, and write reviews. Unfortunately, you can’t group things by series in shelves without going in and manually rearranging them, and you also cannot generate lists of shelves as plain text. Both would be fantastic features, IMHO. Another great feature I’d love to see them add is a way to Auto-arrange the books. By genre (and wouldn’t it be great if they added genres to the books instead of letting users tag the books as whatever genre they please?), alphabetically by author, alphabetically by series, however! But alas, they do not. So I am stuck with struggling through making a book list myself. 😦 And I just messed it up. I’m still open for ideas for books if you would like to share! Chances are though, I have it on my list already. 🙂

I was very pleasantly surprised by this book. I expected way more romance, mindless female-worshipping, sickly obsessions, (not so) dreamy male antagonists, and a brainless flirt of of a woman for a protagonist. Oh, and not to mention I’m aware that most ‘romance’ novels are like porn in book form for women. Instead, this is an awesome story about a woman named Natiya who is incubating a dragon egg to try to get revenge on the evil emperor, Dag Racho, since he killed her entire family. With that being said, it still sounds like a really mediocre book. But the back cover really intrigued me. It reads:

One Protector

When dragon power flows through your veins, when dragon thoughts burn in your mind, you can accomplish anything. Natiya knows, for she carries one of the last egs in the land disguised as a jewel in her navel. Day by day the Unhatched grows, and when at last it births they will be joined in a sacred and eternal bond. Gone will be the barmaid forced to dance for pennies; born will be Dag Natiya, revered Queen. Taker her body or her soul; nothing will stop them.

One Slayer

When dragon power flows through your veins, when dragon emotions trample your soul, you become a monster. So knows Kiril, for one destroyed his cousin. No matter how kind or joyful, all beings must succumb to the power of the wyrm. That is why Kiril vowed to destroy dragonkind – and he has almost succeeded. Only one egg remains. But there is an obstacle he did not foresee: love.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So, as this states, Natiya and Kiril fall in love. The only obstacle is she is incubating a dragon egg, and he is the emperor’s prized dragon killer. Rather than the both of them being lovesick fools who fall into each other’s arms the entire time and do nothing but shag and the plot magically unfolds itself, there is a race with time before the egg hatches, and before they are caught by Dag Racho and killed.

I found the plot to be highly captivating, and the characters to be well fleshed out and interactions between them were well thought out and in sync with their emotions, back stories, and personalities. The only part I am mildly annoyed with is the overt lust and the (few) sex scenes in the book. I enjoyed that the focus was not on the romance, but I’m still not sure I like any romance in my books at all. I mean, sure the plot twist of them falling in love is great and all, but does Kiril really have to be fondling her every chance he gets? Natiya is portrayed as an intelligent but hard up woman, who has a stash of books underneath her bed, and spurns every man who tries to flirt with her. Now here comes Kiril and she’s squirming up against him. In my honest opinion, this was a great book until the lust and sex came into it. I skimmed through those parts. I think it would have been better as a love story, not a smut story in other words.

Still, the book was good. One of my favorite parts was the interaction between the dragon and the person incubating it, and the time and effort that went into creating and describing the bond that they share. The bond the dragonborn share is my absolute favorite part of the book.

I am both slightly appalled that I enjoyed a romance, and proud of myself for giving it a chance. I’m not sure it’s a whole new genre I want to jump into, but hey, it was a good read (and it only took me 2 days to finish!)

I actually bought this book accidentally when looking for The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. After realizing my mistake, I was keen on returning it for the book I wanted. However, having a new book in my hands, I had to read it. And you know what? I’m glad I did.

Being on the opposite side of the spectrum of the book I was looking for, The God Theory by Bernard Haisch is a legitimate scientific theory on the existence of a ‘God’, or as he terms it, ‘an infinite conscious intelligence’. However, this book is not a bible-thumping, age-old argument spouting, narrow-minded piece of work spouted by an evangelist. This book was written by an astrophysicist, who does not believe in mass religion, and one who took the time to write a theory on how  ‘God’ could exist without breaking any scientific evidence.

With that being said, I want to remind you that this is a legitimate scientific theory. This is not a book for light reading, or a novel to take you away on the wings of creativity. This is a scientific essay. The arguments provided are well-founded, and based in research. A lot of these went well over my head, even after doing hours of research to gain the back knowledge needed to read this book. All in all, I spent more time researching previous work, theories, research, events, and scientific laws that are referenced in the book than I did reading the book. If you are not scientifically-minded, interested in non-fiction, or willing to research scientific achievements and references for hours on end, this book is not for you.  On the flip side, if you are convinced there is not a god, and would like to read (probably the first) a logical argument as to why god may exist, or are unsure, or even if you believe in god but not mass religion; if you enjoy learning new things, and enjoy finding out random tidbits of scientific theories and works that us lay-men have never heard of, you’ll probably enjoy this book.

With that being said, let’s move on. This book contains both a preface and an introduction, which, if you’re in the habit of skipping (I know I skip them when it’s simply another writer praising the book or reading sub-conscious “meanings” in a novel) I suggest you think again. They outline the entirety of the book, and set the premises for the arguments. As should be, considering this is a scientific essay. Oh, and in case you didn’t catch that, this book is a scientific essay. There are a couple extremely basic arguments covered in preface and introduction that are not repeated later on, most likely because they are basic and do not require repeating or going more in-depth. Even in the preface, I had to look up and research such things as ‘quantum fluctuations’, ‘quantum laws’, ‘string theory’ (which I think everyone knows a little about, but nothing like what you can read about it when you actually look into it), ‘inflation fields’ and find the definitions for things such as ‘neuro-physiological epiphenomenon’, or ‘philosophical centrists’. This is not even ten pages into the book.

The chapters are titled, and then further broken up into segments. The first chapter is titled “Personal Journey”, and details his professional life. This lends credence to his arguments, giving him both a background in religion and science. The sub-chapters (I’m not sure what else to call them) are titled “From Archabbey to Astrophysics”, “Launching a Career’, “Age of discovery”, and “Return of the Astronomer-Priest”. Please be aware (unlike my dolt of a friend I tried to convince to read this – unsuccessfully) that Bernard Haisch is an Astrophysicist. Meaning he studies the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe (and yes, I looked that up. 😛 ). He is not one of those new-age hippies who calls himself an astronomer and makes predictions based on the angle of Venus to Jupiter. That is just for clarity (I get annoyed with idiots very fast). Anyways, this first chapter details his religious background, his change into the scientific world, his professional achievements, research, and theories, and finally, the merging of his concept of ‘God’ and science.

The second chapter is “Asking Fundamental Questions”, which includes “The God Theory and Creation”, “The God Theory, Karma, and the Golden Rule”, “The God Theory and Reductionism”. Chapter three is titled “Explaining Creation”. The sub-chapters are “Creation by Subtraction”, which actually holds the strongest piece of imagery/argument (for me) in the entire book. The others in the chapter are “Polarity” and “The God Theory and Consciousness.” Chapter four is “Reductionism and a Spiritual Worldview”, detailing “Superstrings and the Supernatural”, “A Spiritual Worldview”, and “No Need for Intelligent Design”. Now that you have an idea of the types of chapters and sub-chapters in the book, I’d like to share that there are a total of eleven chapters, not including the Preface, Introduction, or Bibliography.

A lot of those probably sounded extremely detailed and way too complex to grasp. This is why I said that there will be a lot of research that goes into reading the book. At the same time, however, many of the arguments and sections that are brought up are well-explained, and require little to no background study to understand them. Such as the following excerpt from the Preface:

“Science today is based on the premises of materialism, reductionism, and randomness. Materialism is the belief that reality consists solely of matter and energy, the things that can be measured in a laboratory or observed by a telescope. Everything else is illusion of imagination. Reductionism is the belief that complex things can be explained by examining the constituent pieces, such as the illusion of consciousness arising from elementary chemical processes in the brain. Randomness is the conviction that natural processes follow the laws of chance within their allowed range of behavior.”

This information is provided in a clear, straight-forward manner, which is not difficult at all to comprehend. I suppose with the correct background in scientific study, the entire book would be clear and concise, but I’m afraid to those of us who read textbooks in our spare time (Wait, you mean you don’t? :O ) rather than having a formal eduction, a lot of this is very complex. Even looking into theories mentioned in passing, you have to read about the theory, then read more information on the theories that the initial theory was based on, and so on and so forth until you finally reach information you can comprehend, and then work backwards. It’s a lovely challenge; I loved spending time trying to reason things out and teach myself cutting-edge scientific theories.

My favorite section, and the one that stuck with me the best, is the “Creation by Subtraction”. The section is too long for me to type out, but I will sum it up the best I can. Think about a computer screen, or a projector. When it is on, there will be a plain, white light. By laying filters over this light, you can create images; since white light contains all of the colors, in order to create images, you simply have to filter out the undesired colors in the proper places. To create a photo of a family on vacation is not done by chance, it is done by intelligent subtraction. Further, to create a motion picture, a two-dimensional replica of our world, you simply have to show frames of movement at the right speed, using the filters to create each frame. Thus the white light does not change, the filters do, and the sum becomes more than the individual pieces. In this way, ‘God’ is the infinite, and to create our world, a filter was placed over, to give the desired result. So rather than an infinite number or realities with an infinite number of possibilities over the infinite number of realities, there is one reality, with an infinite number of possibilities depending on the filter used. Please note that this is all paraphrasing, and I am in no way taking credit for this, and in fact, I may have misinterpreted what the author was trying to say (although how I have interpreted it makes perfect sense to me 😛 ).

In conclusion (I feel I’ve been rambling for a while), this book is definitely worth the read. I have always been strictly a non-believer, but if there were to be a ‘God’, and they could prove its existence, then this is how I believe that ‘God’ would exist. However, I still don’t believe in mass religions, or go to church, anything of the sort. I would still consider myself atheist, and I will until the scientific community walks up to me and slaps me in the face with some proof. However, this book was a real eye-opener, refreshing to read due to its professionalism, and fascinating in every aspect. I highly recommend this.

I was going to do a spotlight on The Legend of Drizzt, but there are so many of those books, and he’s written so many other good books, it would be difficult to do. Instead I decided to do a look at all his books, but that proved to be too long. This focuses on The Legend of Drizzt series, but also includes The Cleric Quintet since it is directly related to the series.I will finish off with the rest of his books soon, hopefully.

To begin, his most well-known and most extensive series would be The Legend of Drizzt.  The first series (it was written as a series of smaller series of books) by publication date is The Icewind Dale Trilogy, and although chronologically should belong second in the series, I recommend reading this first, especially if you are new to the Forgotten Realms books. The Icewind Dale Trilogy contains The Crystal Shard, Streams of Silver, and The Halfling’s Gem. I recommend reading The Dark Elf Trilogy next, although it is the prequel. This trilogy includes Homeland Exile, and Sojourn. It makes more sense once you have a firm grasp on the world and the characters. After The Dark Elf Trilogy was published, came Legacy of The Drow. It follows The Icewind Dale Trilogy chronologically, so don’t get your storyline mixed up! This series includes the books The Legacy, Starless Night, Siege of Darkness, and Passage to Dawn. Next in the storyline is the series Paths of Darkness, including The Silent Blade, The Spine of the World, and Sea of Swords. Originally, Servant of The Shard was part of this series as well, but it has been moved into the next series for reasons I’m not sure of. I remember reading it, but I can’t remember enough of the plot to know whether it makes more sense in the original order, or the new order, so I’m writing these in the new order, since I vaguely remember the book we had as having it marked as an excerpt of something to come later. The next to come is The Sellswords, which is Servant of the Shard, Promise of the Witch King, and Road of the Patriarch, which is followed by The Hunter’s Blades Trilogy comprising The Thousand Orcs, The Lone Drow, and The Two Swords. To be completely honest, this is as far as I have made it into the series and it was all wonderful (with the exception of a beautifully written plot twist that mangled my favorite character and left me angry, but it was still well written). I was too busy reading other books to finish Transitions, which includes The Orc King, The Pirate King, and The Ghost King, but from what I have heard they are every bit as good as the other books. The series finishes off with (for now, I’m not sure if it will be continued) Neverwinter which has three books, the last is planned to be released August 7th, 2012. Their titles are Gauntlgrym, Neverwinter, and Charon’s Claw. For a total of 26 books in the main storyline, purchasing all the books is expensive, which is exactly what you will end up doing once you start the series.

I read these originally when I was in 5th grade (I had a rather high reading level for my age; I read the Little House on the Prairie books in 2nd grade 😛 ) so my memories of the plot are not amazing. Dwayne is reading it for the first time, and we talk about the plot every night. He’s constantly telling me he gets weird looks reading on the trains because he bursts out laughing while he’s reading. This is something I definitely remember, the characters have great humour and the books are highly enjoyable. Even so, these are not intended as comedy. The battle scenes are well written, intense and serious without being horrifically gory, and the adventures and fantasy aspects are well done also. Even the plot twists I don’t like are beautifully worked out. The characters are constantly evolving, yet they are timeless. The play between characters is well thought out, and even the characters who come into play once, and then come back several books after are consistent and well done. These will keep you guessing, laughing, and interested for a very long time. They are not as long as some of the books I’ve read recently, and Dwayne has been reading them in 3-4 days apiece, though I’ll admit he has had his nose stuck in them constantly!

Not following the main storyline, but including characters that come into play in The Legend of Drizzt books, is The Cleric Quintet. This series includes Canticle, In Sylvan Shadows, Night Masks, The Fallen Fortress, and The Chaos Curse. As per his previous writings, this is expertly written and an amazing source of entertainment. The plot will draw you in and surprise you, whilst characters are sticking their thumbs in their ears and waggling their fingers at you (literally). This is the back story of characters included in The Legend of Drizzt Series. Like all his other books, this is well worth the read. It was published after The Dark Elf Trilogy, so if you read it alongside the other books, I would recommend after The Dark Elf Trilogy but before Legacy of the Drow. 

Happy reading!

 

First published in 1934, this book was subsequently banned from being imported into the US. BY 1938, it had also been added to the list of banned books in Canada as well. In the UK, the only copies available were smuggled into the country. I have always been a fan of banned books, because usually the controversy is over political or religious views. But in the case of this book, it is due to the blatant vulgarity, obscenity, and profanity. This is not a masterpiece with revolutionary ideas hidden inside that world leaders refused to have available to the public. In fact, the only claims to fame this book has is being banned due to obscenity, and the fact that it is one of the most horridly written books on the face of the planet.  This is the review I wrote of this a few months ago:

Started this before I moved, and lost the book. It was found and sent to me, and it’s time to finish reading it. So far, I’ve thought it was very messily written, jumping from one idea to another to another, until you’ve lost the original thought and then crashing back into the original idea, in a shattering, lose-your-train-of-thought way. It doesn’t hold your attention, in that it seems to be trying to make you lose where you were, but the parts that make sense and flow smoothly are enough to make you lose yourself in it for a few minutes until the jarring writing snaps you back into wondering what’s happening. One of the strangest books I’ve ever read, I’m not sure whether this is interesting and engaging, or a worthless waste of time and money. I suppose it takes some level of genius to write a book people aren’t sure whether they should put it down and never pick it up again, but keep reading to the finish. Very strange indeed.

Even now, I think this is a pretty accurate description. The thing I hate most about the book is the fact that the ideas jump from one place to another, back and forth, or will go off on a tangent, then jump back to an idea 5 or 6 pages beforehand. It’s like wading through the mind of a man who has gone insane, and then been shaken so hard everything in his mind crashes together into a huge jumble. I will agree with other reviewers in that this book is a brutally honest look into one man’s life, but at the same time, this is more a drunken rambling of sexual exploits and god knows what else I missed.

So bottom line: Don’t read this book. If you want to read it for the vulgarity or obscenity, pick up a woman’s romance instead (I swear those books are most women’s equivalent to porn). If you’re in it because it’s a banned book, there are much more intelligent books that have caused widespread controversy waiting for you to read them.

So I mentioned this book in my list of books that I loved and hated and wanted to read. Just to let you know, every book on that list that I labelled as being a recommendation or to avoid, I have read. I will not bash a book or gloat about it until I have read it and decided for myself. So, onwards to the review!

I wanted to mention Robert Heinlein’s Orphans of the Sky. It’s one of his short novels, but that makes it all the better. Personally, I’ve found his full-length novels drag on with a lot of filling, but not much plot. His shorter books are an afternoon read, but they keep you well entertained. The plot of this book is fantastic, and it gets 5 stars from me! If you have any used book stores in the area (especially such as Half Price Books in the US) try and pick up an older copy of the book. I paid 35 cents for mine. A great use for pocket change! Oh, and just another note, I use short books like this to clear my mind when I’m in the middle of a huge series that seems to be dragging on forever. A quick afternoon read to escape somewhere else, and you won’t have to worry about juggling books or plots. Plus it gets your mind out of the rut and makes the series easier to get through. Because face it, no matter how much you love reading, 14 1,000-page books is a bit of a challenge. So, onto the book. You can safely read the minor spoiler section… I’m just covering the premesis of the book. But make sure you don’t read the major spoiler section below! That’s my review and has info in it you won’t want to know beforehand!

**Minor Spoiler**

The back of the book (at least my edition) reads: The Universe was five miles long, and 2000 feet across. Men scoffed at the legends of such things as stars, or the demented idea that the Ship was moving… for the Ship was the Universe, and there could be nothing outside. Then one man found his way into a forgotten room, and saw the stars – and they moved….

The premesis of the book is that the crew of a spaceship, traveling to Alpha Centauri, mutinied and killed all of the officers and crewmen. Several generations down the line (it was supposed to take 2-3 generations, but when the crew was killed, the spaceship was shut down and simply drifted through space), the people aboard had forgotten that it was a spaceship, and believed that the ship was the entire galaxy.

I find the idea absolutely fascinating. I have never read anything even remotely similar to this, and it caught my attention from the get-go. If you’re interested in the book, don’t read on. It has spoilers. So go buy it! If you already have, read on to the bottom to see if you agree with my review.

**Major Spoilers**

Don’t read this until after you’ve read the book, or don’t plan on reading it. But seriously, go read the book.

Throughout the book, Hugh is talking to mutants and discovering more and more about the stars and the ship he’s on. It was really well written, and the characters were fantastically created. I loved the pace of the book; very little downtime or boring, dry chapters. My only complaint is the ending of the book seemed rushed (probably because at the length of the book, the end is only about 15-20 pages) and also a tad ridiculous. How is it that after magically escaping in a pod on the ship, they just magically happen to land on the one moon that can sustain life? How? I mean, come on. I would have been happier if they had all died! But aside from this mediocre ending, the book was amazing. Well written, and well worth the short read.